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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
especially the potential deal. we are covering all of this for npr and he joins us from london, david, welcome. rupert murdock is in britain, who wants to talk to him and what about? >> there's a parliamentary committee hat has requested his presence, the presence of his son james murdock who is the top news corp. executive here in the united kingdom. and rebecca brook she's the chief executive over the news corporate newspapers here in the uk and she was editor and chief at the time of some of the most egregious alleged incident. >> do they have the power of a subpoena? >> there's some question about that. news international, the newspaper division has put out a statement saying that both mr. murdock, james murdock and ms. brooks will cooperate. but they didn't say necessarily that they'll testify so there's some question as to what form that cooperation will take. >> what does news international have to say about the latest allegations concerning former prime minister gordon brown? >> well he made these very anguished charges that news corp. had essentially targeted him, had sought
on our debt, many are wondering where the government can dustststs. the npr came up with one idea. >> each day the u.s. treasury mints nearly $2 million in coins. coins that mostly go directly into storage. abc's john karl checked it out. >> reporter: we took a journey to the u.s. mint in philadelphia where they seem to haveore doors than "get martsmart." for a lesson in how the government is losing money by making money. it sounds a little bit like las vegas around here except the coins never stop coming. this is the presidential dollar coin. congress ordered the mint to make millions of them to honor every dead president. but nobody seems to want them. rutherford b. hayes. off the press, literally, these coins are still warm. they cost 32 cents a pop to make. the mint makes nearly 2 million of them every day. do the math. about $600,000 a day to make them. and each one of these bags, 140,000 coins, $140,000,, more than 2,000 pounds. because almost nobody uses these things most go directly into storage. we found a bunch of them 100 miles down the road in a vault. here at the fede
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)